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Cleadon Weather Station

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ELTA 1951-2000

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The site and the generation of a homogenised record

The Oregon Scientific WMR928NX AWS that is currently operational is located in a moderately-sized suburban garden in Cleadon at a height of approximately 40m above sea level. The thermometer is situated in a home-made Stevenson Screen. The rain gauge is a standard AWS gauge that reports to an accuracy of 1mm, which has its drawbacks, but the earlier years of my records (before I acquired this AWS) also had rainfall measured to the nearest millimetre, so it is at least consistent. The thermometer is situated in a home-made Stevenson Screen.

The instruments are located rather closer to the edge of the garden than ideal, for practical reasons. The daily temperatures are adjusted to allow for this during the summer half-year, with adjustments of 0.5C for maxima on sunny days from March-September that occur outside of 3-7pm, and larger adjustments for maxima that occur within that period, and small adjustments (of up to 0.5C) to the minima under radiation conditions from May-August. Rainfall readings and temperature readings from October-February are left unaltered as solar radiation is not sufficiently strong then to affect the readings. The mean monthly temperatures given here in the summer half-year will thus differ slightly from the readings given in the Climatological Observers Link (to which I send monthly values based on the unaltered readings).

I have maintained a record of "days of" variables (occurrences of hail/sleet/snow/thunder/fog) since the very beginning- something that is increasingly lacking in the nation's observing network as the Met Office moves away from manned sites and towards automated sites. Reports of "days of" variables come from myself and, when I am unavailable at the location, third party reports- which are always checked against radar sequences and prevailing conditions to make sure that they are not bogus.

Readings from 1993-2004 stem from earlier instruments and are thus subject to rather more uncertainty as they are significantly error-corrected to take the use of different instrumentation into account (I ran a comparison of the AWS readings from the Stevenson Screen with the earlier instruments during 2006/07). The heavy use of error-corrections is a downside but it means that the record is as homogeneous as I can get it, and there are consistent monthly differences with respect to Durham University Observatory (which has served as my main comparison point over the years) which suggests that the record should at least be reasonably representative.